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Master Programs in Creative Arts in England United Kingdom

For those interested in art, music, dance, or drama, the study of creative arts may be ideal. These studies are designed to teach students not only the fundamentals of their chosen creative field but also the business and employment opportunities available.

Top Master's Degree in Creative Arts in England in United Kingdom

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Carlisle, United Kingdom

The Creative Practice master brings together students and professionals from a variety of disciplines including film, graphic design, illustration, photography, wildlife and a ... +

The Creative Practice master brings together students and professionals from a variety of disciplines including film, graphic design, illustration, photography, wildlife and adventure media, games design and digital art. So, you will be part of a dynamic and supportive creative community. -
MA
Full-time
Part-time
English
Sep 2022
Campus
 
London, United Kingdom

This MPhil/PhD Creative Arts programme provides advanced training and research experience at a doctoral level in the Creative Arts, broadly understood to encompass a range of ... +

This MPhil/PhD Creative Arts programme provides advanced training and research experience at a doctoral level in the Creative Arts, broadly understood to encompass a range of expressive and performing arts (including dance and theatre), embodied traditions of knowledge (including oratory and artisanal techniques), and aesthetics. The programme recognises that certain established cultural forms fall between the conventional disciplinary boundaries of the Western academy (including dance-dramas, puppetry, fashion, perfumery, and digital artworks) and draws upon the collective expertise of members of the School of Arts to create a platform for critical engagement with these forms. Members of the School of Arts cover a broad geographical area, across Asia and the Middle East, Africa, and diasporic cultures. We also have PhD students working on projects that fall outside of this geographical expanse, including research on Europe and the Americas. Staff often have research interests in issues that cross regional boundaries; our Department Staff page has a summary of their interests, research specialisms and activities. Students in the School of Arts use a variety of research methods, including fieldwork, interview, archival research, recording and filming, performance, transcription and analysis, composition, and curatorial projects. A key feature of the degree in Creatve Arts is the scope for Practice Research, where relevant. This may include design portfolios, installations, and performance. Most SOAS research students spend some time doing fieldwork in the regions of their research. Through SOAS’ various connections with individuals and institutions in the universities and governments of Asia and Africa, students may be able to benefit from personal contacts and introductions. -
Master PhD
Full-time
3 years
English
Sep 2022
15 Jun 2022
Campus
 
London, United Kingdom

The programme exists to encourage skilled practice and creative thinking in the two media of ceramics and glass. We feel that there are interests and outcomes common to both, ... +

The programme exists to encourage skilled practice and creative thinking in the two media of ceramics and glass. We feel that there are interests and outcomes common to both, and students are encouraged to experiment across a range of material possibilities. -
MA
Full-time
English
Sep 2022
Campus
 

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London, United Kingdom

MA in Sculpture Sculpture is a spatial art, intensely practical, yet essentially philosophical. It has always been closely associated with architecture and public space, with ... +

MA in Sculpture Sculpture is a spatial art, intensely practical, yet essentially philosophical. It has always been closely associated with architecture and public space, with ritual and the ceremonial. It is a private art that is often over-publicised. Sculpture at the RCA has been a longstanding programme, and one component of the Fine Art faculty. However our staff and students understand that there is a wider fine art intelligence that falls outside the faculty structure. The debates around painting, often via drawing, and the raw side of printing are closely associated in the minds of good students. The arts of photography, filmmaking, sound and performance, if not quite as much as dance, theatre, the sciences, engineering and urbanism, are habitual reference points. In the same vein, the sense of London as a destination, the physical circumstances of the Sculpture site, its unusual proximities, the perceptions of the programme’s culture, and the imprimatur of the institution, all are the evident triggers for our RCA applicants. Students, staff and visitors join a mix that is set against these variables, and against the economic contingencies at play. The crafts and trades most readily associated with the production side of sculpture usually enjoy prominence in other disciplines and professions. But historically, sculpture has perfected the knack of purloining the material to hand and extending the performance of different media away from their conventional processes. The drift away from handwork and handtools (where the production process is visited direct upon the material and at a much less spectacular speed) to industrial production has swelled the world of RPM-fixed machines. However, within the programme, the energy may be more concentrated directly on the work itself, on the space whenever installation (in all its senses) is involved, or – perhaps – it manifests itself as time-honoured bench work. In all these instances, the play involved in the processes of production is as much technical as it is philosophical. A successful art school is somewhere in which the students and staff and visitors thrive. There needs to be a sense of occasion: lots of gathering and witnessing, and concentrated debate about the academic endeavour and content of RCA Fine Art enterprises. Presence must be understood in a sophisticated and variegated way, not as a simplistic physical opposite of absence. Limitations are not the same as confines, and a sense of inventing protocols and new forms is a great collective vehicle. A climate of enabling needs to prevail where the force of expectation is centred on content and proximity, not on procedure. To the prospective student, the pace of the 18 months of a postgraduate course must be seen as a sophisticated transaction in time- and space-management. The culture of an art school is legible the moment you enter the door. It needs tending and managing on a daily basis, by all players, without exception. The programme offers: associations with a broad constituency of artists, architects, designers and thinkers across the RCA an expectation that the wider discourse this community represents should be a dynamic foil to the work and development of all aspiring RCA Sculpture graduates engagement with the debate over the historical means of production and the material (and dematerialised) processes across different cultures (This is a moment when 50 million Chinese people are joining the world's labour force every year.) dedicated studio space for each student college-wide workshop facilities, including the RCA's celebrated foundry housed in the Sculpture building, and recognition that some of the profoundest contradictions of our time can be confronted in the debate that these very opportunities generate a precedent of graduates in the later twentieth century including John Panting, Hamish Fulton, Alison Wilding, Boyd Webb, Tony Cragg, Richard Wentworth and Drhuva Mistry, and more recently Jake Chapman and Alice Channer. -
MA
Full-time
English
Sep 2022
Campus